E-Marketing for Creative Artists

There are many types of artists creating different wares (such as artwork, photographs, pottery, glass ware, jewellery, ceramics, and so on) who need to rely on marketing online to sell their works.

Many artists have faced the situation where they have been promoting their wares at an event, market or some other location when people who love their work can’t afford to make a purchase on that day. These potential customers may ask for a website address or contact details, so they can make a purchase when they are ready. Artists hand over their details, which are often handwritten on a scrap piece of paper, and wait to be contacted. Meanwhile, that torn bit of paper has accidentally been discarded and people move on with their busy lives.

This situation highlights the basics that every artist should have, including:

  • a website – promote your existing and recent works.
  • professional looking business cards – it needs to clearly state all relevant contact information, and contain a design that represents the artist’s work so it’s easily identifiable. A plain business card with just the details might not be enough to remind people as to who gave them the card and why they have it.
  • email newsletters – constantly remind your potential and existing consumers of the wares they loved are available.

Why? Because all these elements remind potential consumers of an artist’s work, which is often shared with their friends and family, thus building that artist’s profile.

Let’s say you have all the things we’ve just mentioned in place and that original scenario happens where someone asks for your contact details. This time, you hand over a business card, pointing out your website, which showcases your wares, and you ask if the interested person would like to join your mailing list to receive your e-newsletters. Have a sign-up list at events, art shows, craft fairs, galleries and wherever else you may be displaying your work.

Include a sign-up form on your website. Strive for quality content that engages, so people will join your mailing list because they don’t want to miss what you have to say. If possible, offer an enticing free gift in turn for people joining. It should be relevant to your work and is a useful item or something that adds enjoyment. Examples of an artist’s free gift might be a post-card size imprint of a larger art piece or, depending on marketing budget, a customised mouse pad. There’s a large range of promotional marketing products out there, so do a little research and select an item that suits you, your work and your budget. Or you could provide an e-book download full of useful information and techniques.

That newsletter and the chosen free gift can build relationships and help sell your work – it’s a constant reminder.

While newsletter must contain quality content and be engaging, some times content ideas can be a bit elusive, but if you focus on you or your wares then you’ll come up with plenty of content fodder on topics, such as:

  • how you create your wares,
  • how you used a particular technique or style,
  • what inspired you to create a particular work,
  • how a particular work of yours or someone else’s work affects you,
  • what you see at an art show or event that you attended,
  • about the art show or event itself,
  • about a particular artist who inspires you.

There is an underlying reason for publishing a newsletter, which is why it’s important to always include a call to action. It might be to visit your website, to accept an invite to an event where you’ll be displaying your work, or to contact you to purchase your work. This can be as simple as a linkable line of text enticing people to visit your website or accept an invitation. It can be more eye-catching with graphics or some other feature, but remember people are signing up for the content and not blatant advertising.

Not everyone is comfortable with writing, so if you’d rather spend your time working on your latest creative masterpiece instead of writing about it, then consider hiring a content writer to carry the burden for you.

 

Image by Kaitlyn Small from Pixabay

General Tips When Writing Documents

There are certain guidelines that should be followed with all your documentation if you want your business and your actions to be trusted and respected.

Facts, facts, facts

Get your facts right. Don’t presume, guess or surmise. A factual article or business document should be conclusive of its information, so check the facts. Ideally, recheck your facts with multiple resources.

Give credit where credit is due

This includes in text citations, references, and quoting other people. Never steal or ‘borrow’ someone else’s phrase without giving them the credit for it. Never disguise someone else’s hard work, idea, or anything else for that matter as your own.

Don’t include everybody

How many times do you hear someone arguing a point and carelessly include that everybody has the same opinion as the person speaking. No one can know what everybody is thinking or know everyone’s individual opinions, so that makes the statement ludicrous. What are the chances of everyone having the same opinion? Even if the majority do share the same thoughts, there will be those who don’t.

Leave personal opinions out

Unless you are an expert in your field, leave out your personal views. Your opinion may be clouded by personal experience, which can sometimes be unique and not shared by others. Stick to the facts and what esteemed professionals have proved rather than your take on a subject.

No part of this may be represented in any medium without written consent from the author. Mary Broadhurst c 2014

E-Marketing

E-marketing is an important step in promoting your business. The Internet is a popular source for people to research and when they are ready to buy, you want them to think of you. Whether you’re skilled with using a computer or not, if you have a business then you need to market that business online or you’re just throwing potential sales away.

One of the best ways to market your business and provide customer service is to offer free information. This way customers will be enticed to visit your website for self-education on a product or service. Then when they are ready to buy they will be more inclined to purchase from someone who has supplied them with the knowledge they needed to make a sound decision. Even if they decide the product or service is not right for them, they may tell their friends, who are in the market for that item. Never lie or embellish, your information must be accurate and not misleading.

There are a number of ways you can reach out to your potential customers besides offering free information on your website. Provide free assistance via email. There are many people who would rather send off an email than pick up the phone. Cater to that demand.

You could write articles known as blogs or reprint articles. Potential customers will search the Internet and read articles to gain more knowledge. If you peak their interest, then they can click on the link from that article and be directed to your website. Offer more information, give them a reason to spend some time in your online store, encourage them to join your mailing list.

If you do have a mailing list then don’t make the mistake of using it strictly as a selling campaign. It’s never wise to inundate people with emails. People have trusted you with their email address, so respect that. Otherwise you will be an annoyance and have potential customers clicking on the link to stop ongoing correspondence. You should always have a link to opt out of future emails.

Handed correctly, these types of emails are designed to remind your customers that you are there when they are ready to purchase. Offer more information, suggestions, and tips; better yet – try to get some interaction happening.

No part of this may be represented in any medium without written consent from the author. Mary Broadhurst c 2014