Produce Calendars For Promotion And A Second Income

Creative artists can help support their passion with a secondary income that promotes their wares. There are multiple ways to do this. This article focuses on one of those avenues. Producing calendars is not a new idea, but it’s effective because they are widely used.

You can use your talents and create beautiful unique calendars of different sizes, formats and images. Your calendar can cover 12 months, 18 months or 24 months. If money is a little tight, create a year-at-a-glance desk calendar with one image. It’s the business card that works every day and people won’t throw it away until it runs out.

If your wares are paintings, pottery, or anything resulting from materials, then simply take photos to be used in the calendar. If you’re a photographer, then you already have your supply of images. However, if your talents stem from intellectual means, such as a writer, then team up with another creative artist for the images and write inspirational messages to match the images. Alternatively, writers could hire designers to provide a beautiful backdrop for their poetry.

There are many websites that offer creating unique calendars, which will require research to find the best option for you. Some of these offer free accounts for restricted design capabilities and paid accounts for their full service, such as Canva. Others will allow you to create unique calendars and charge for the printing (and delivery in some cases), such as Shutterfly or Vistaprint. Alternatively, you may wish to hire a designer and have it professionally printed at your local printer. Professional looking calendars will entice more people to purchase; however, this does mean you will have to pay the cost of producing the calendars.

Make sure you display your calendars at markets and events where you are promoting and selling your wares. People, who may not be able to afford to purchase your wares at that time, may be enticed to buy your beautiful calendar showcasing your work. Don’t forget to include your contact details on the back of the calendar so people can purchase your wares when they are ready.

 

Image by Alex_Berlin from Pixabay

Website Content for Creative Artists, Clubs and Small Business Owners

You’re busy creating your wares, running your small business, or growing your club. You chat to someone who asks for your website details. But wait! You don’t have a website? That person gives you a look like you’re from the dark ages and the barrage begins:

  • how can you run a business without a website?
  • how can you compete with your competitors without a website?
  • how will people find you or see what you offer without a website?

And the annoying part is that it’s all true. No matter if you’re a creative artist, or if you’re trying to help a club grow its membership, or a sole business owner trying to do everything – you need a website.

Perhaps you are concerned that you don’t know what information to include in a website, or you don’t have the time to create and then maintain a website. Valid reasons, but don’t let that stop you.

It’s not that scary when you break it down to what a website is to achieve. For the website owner, it might be to sell products or services, to increase memberships, or to grow your clientele. Besides this, your website must serve a purpose for visitors, such as knowledge and instruction, and if the visitors are satisfied then they will consider your goods or services or membership.

Once you know a website’s purpose, it’s a matter of creating a website that fulfils the needs of the owner and the visitors.

The Website Owner – which category do you fall under?

Creative Artists are motivated to:

  • sell wares (e.g. paintings, pottery, jewellery, books, etc.)
  • sell services (e.g. freelance writer) or commission work (e.g. painting)
  • provide a mailing list for newsletters and to grow clientele.

Small Business Owners will want to:

  • sell products and/or services depending on the business
  • provide a mailing list for newsletters and to grow clientele.

Clubs might be eager to:

  • sell products or services depending on the club (e.g. merchandise, e-books, horse riding lessons, memberships, courses, etc.)
  • provide a mailing list for newsletters and memberships.

This highlights that you will need to dedicate space on your website to sell and promote your products and services. You will need to include a mailing list for visitors to join.

Visitors

Visitors are looking for:

  • Intellectual knowledge – this could be basic information for beginners or more in-depth information to add to existing knowledge.
  • Instructions on how to perform a task, how to handle a situation, how to do something like the professionals, and so on.
  • Interest in a particular field, such as the arts and wanting to know how particular artwork is created, tips on sailing, horse riding, or better care for a pet.
  • Required interest in a particular field – this is usually the result of researching a product or service prior to purchasing.

This indicates that you need to include quality content on your website that will interest visitors, get them to click through your web pages or blog and join your mailing list.

Other Important Pages

It would be wise to include these other important pages:

  • Home Page – this is your entry point, the door to your virtual shop. It’s your chance to peak your visitors’ interest.
  • Contact Page – so people can contact you. You may want to do this through a contact form as a spam preventative.
  • About Us – people want to know about you. Briefly tell them about your company’s history and why you’re different from your competitors.
  • FAQ – provide answers to frequently asked questions and save yourself and your visitors some time.
  • Testimonials – this is one of those occasions that it’s okay to brag. Tell the world about your great reviews.
  • Privacy Page – so people know how their information is used and/or stored.
  • Events Page – especially important for those creative artists and clubs.

Now you know what pages you need for your website or to improve your existing website.


Image by Henry Romero from Pixabay

 

E-Marketing for Creative Artists

There are many types of artists creating different wares (such as artwork, photographs, pottery, glass ware, jewellery, ceramics, and so on) who need to rely on marketing online to sell their works.

Many artists have faced the situation where they have been promoting their wares at an event, market or some other location when people who love their work can’t afford to make a purchase on that day. These potential customers may ask for a website address or contact details, so they can make a purchase when they are ready. Artists hand over their details, which are often handwritten on a scrap piece of paper, and wait to be contacted. Meanwhile, that torn bit of paper has accidentally been discarded and people move on with their busy lives.

This situation highlights the basics that every artist should have, including:

  • a website – promote your existing and recent works.
  • professional looking business cards – it needs to clearly state all relevant contact information, and contain a design that represents the artist’s work so it’s easily identifiable. A plain business card with just the details might not be enough to remind people as to who gave them the card and why they have it.
  • email newsletters – constantly remind your potential and existing consumers of the wares they loved are available.

Why? Because all these elements remind potential consumers of an artist’s work, which is often shared with their friends and family, thus building that artist’s profile.

Let’s say you have all the things we’ve just mentioned in place and that original scenario happens where someone asks for your contact details. This time, you hand over a business card, pointing out your website, which showcases your wares, and you ask if the interested person would like to join your mailing list to receive your e-newsletters. Have a sign-up list at events, art shows, craft fairs, galleries and wherever else you may be displaying your work.

Include a sign-up form on your website. Strive for quality content that engages, so people will join your mailing list because they don’t want to miss what you have to say. If possible, offer an enticing free gift in turn for people joining. It should be relevant to your work and is a useful item or something that adds enjoyment. Examples of an artist’s free gift might be a post-card size imprint of a larger art piece or, depending on marketing budget, a customised mouse pad. There’s a large range of promotional marketing products out there, so do a little research and select an item that suits you, your work and your budget. Or you could provide an e-book download full of useful information and techniques.

That newsletter and the chosen free gift can build relationships and help sell your work – it’s a constant reminder.

While newsletter must contain quality content and be engaging, some times content ideas can be a bit elusive, but if you focus on you or your wares then you’ll come up with plenty of content fodder on topics, such as:

  • how you create your wares,
  • how you used a particular technique or style,
  • what inspired you to create a particular work,
  • how a particular work of yours or someone else’s work affects you,
  • what you see at an art show or event that you attended,
  • about the art show or event itself,
  • about a particular artist who inspires you.

There is an underlying reason for publishing a newsletter, which is why it’s important to always include a call to action. It might be to visit your website, to accept an invite to an event where you’ll be displaying your work, or to contact you to purchase your work. This can be as simple as a linkable line of text enticing people to visit your website or accept an invitation. It can be more eye-catching with graphics or some other feature, but remember people are signing up for the content and not blatant advertising.

Not everyone is comfortable with writing, so if you’d rather spend your time working on your latest creative masterpiece instead of writing about it, then consider hiring a content writer to carry the burden for you.

 

Image by Kaitlyn Small from Pixabay